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Dr. Heinz Schandl

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Dr. Heinz Schandl is a senior science leader at the CSIRO and leads policy research and modelling to support sustainable consumption and production, sustainable materials management and circular economy policies and practices. He was a co-author of the Australian National Outlook based on a multi-model framework to analyze different scenarios for natural resource use, emissions, employment and economic growth which was recently published in the premier journal Nature. He pioneered a new indicator of material footprint of consumption published in PNAS.

He is an adjunct professor at the Graduate School of Environmental Studies at Nagoya University, Japan. Dr Schandl is an expert member of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) International Resource Panel (IRP) where he leads the work stream for global material flows and resource productivity. He led the assessment study on global material flows which established an authoritative dataset for global material extraction at a high level of detail for primary materials. He leads a modelling study of the UNEP IRP undertaken for the G7 leadership creating scenarios for global material use under different assumptions of climate and resource efficiency policies. Through his participation a working relationship with the UNEP IRP will be established. Dr Schandl has led international research teams for the European Commission, the OECD, the UNEP, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. He has been the expert member for assessing vulnerabilities and risks of natural resources for ESCAP in the process of regional integration in Asia and the Pacific and a coordinating lead author for resource efficiency for the regional report of the sixth Global Environmental Outlook (GEO6). He is an expert member of the United Nations Commission for Regional Development (UNCRD) regional 3R Forum for Asia and the Pacific and his research has informed policy formulation in Japan, China and Australia.